Autistic Reality

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University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

Jul 1, 2013 to 2016 · Master’s in Disability Studies · Buffalo, New York


Through a non-medical and non-clinical interdisciplinary curriculum, this new program seeks to provide students with the knowledge base and theoretical means to question conventional understandings of the normal body and mind. Both core and elective courses in the program are oriented toward an analysis of historical, anthropological, sociological, and literary texts on disability and the lives of people with disabilities.


The program is a perfect complement to an education in medical and clinical fields for professionals and pre-professionals in fields such as rehabilitative and occupational therapy, nursing, social work, and various support services. The program will also be of interest to public school teachers and administrators developing curriculum for primary and secondary schools in disability-related subject matter.


Requirements for the Master of Arts (M.A.) in “Humanities - Interdisciplinary” with a formal Concentration in Disability Studies


  • Students will be admitted to the program by the Director of the Center for Disability Studies acting in concert with an admissions committee.
  • Students will complete a total of 30 units of core and elective courses that have been approved by the Center for Disability Studies, plus 6 units of supervised project or internship.
  • Students will take 5 (15 units) core courses to complete the degree.
  • During their first semester of enrollment, students will take Disability Studies (fall semester).
  • During their second semester, students will take Disability History I (spring semester).
  • The remaining 3 core courses (totaling 9 units) may be taken anytime during the student’s tenure.
  • Students will take 5 elective courses (totaling 15 units) as part of the degree.
  • Students will take 6 units (1 course per semester) of supervised project or internship credit during their final year in the program.
  • Students will select their electives from the list of pre-approved elective courses within the Disability.
  • Advanced students will be allowed to petition the Director of the Center for Disability Studies to take elective courses that do not appear on the list of electives, but are directly relevant to their own interests within disability studies.

Disability History I
This course is an introduction to the field of disability history. It is a survey of disability history from antiquity to the twentieth century and as such offers students a broad overview of relevant work in the field. It places disability and impairment in historical context, exploring changes and continuities in the ways in which people in different times and locations have thought about both concepts in law and policy, in scientific, medical, political, and social discourse, and in popular and high culture. A critical analysis of the lived experience of those individuals perceived to be disabled/impaired, as well as the intersection of disability with race, ethnicity, nationality, religion, age, class, gender, and sexuality are central to this course.

American Social History 1

Since the 1960s, historians have become increasingly interested in writing social histories. Driven by Marxist theories of class struggle, a post‐World War II egalitarian ethos, and global civil rights and anti-colonial struggles, early social historians sought to write histories “from the bottom up,” focusing on historically marginalized, disenfranchised, and disempowered groups. More recent social historians interested in promoting civil and human rights and social justice, and influenced by feminist, queer, and critical race theorists continue to analyze the experiences of and give voice to long silenced individuals and groups. In this course, we will explore the social history of the United States from colonial times to the late 20th century. Along the way, we will ask ourselves what it means to “do” social history. What types of sources do social historians use? What types of questions do they ask? How has social history changed our perceptions of US history? We will engage in a critical discussion of both “classic” social history monographs and more recent social histories.


Advanced Reading in Disability and Veterans


Topics in History of Science: History of Disability and Eugenics

One hundred twenty five years have passed since the statistician and English aristocrat, Francis Galton, first used the term ‘eugenics’ to describe his scientific system for ‘improving’ the human race and by extension, society. During that time, eugenics has assumed many forms and taken on many meanings. A multifarious group of historical actors has initiated a wide range of programs, all in the name of eugenics. Much of the eugenic doctrine that led to the creation of those programs has since fallen into disrepute, and the programs themselves have been repealed or systematically dismantled (e.g. Black 2003; Kline 2001; Largent 2008; Lunbeck 1994; Ordover 2003; Rafter 1997; Schoen 2005; Stern 2005). Yet eugenic thinking continues to occupy an important position in popular culture and scientific discourse the world over. The notion that innate human differences exist, that those differences can be measured accurately, and that modern science can be used to guide the course of human reproduction and thereby improve society continues to influence experts, politicians, and the individuals and institutions that fund them.


In this course we will explore and analyze the history of eugenics, as well as the material history of the broad (historically contingent and continually changing) groups of individuals perceived to be eugenically ‘unfit.’ We will use an interdisciplinary approach, drawing from philosophy (bio-ethics), women and gender studies, disability studies, literary and film studies, and various subfields within history to elucidate the rich history of eugenics from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. The course will focus on, among other things: 1) the creation and contestation of ‘medico-scientific’ classifications of various mental ‘abilities,’ psychological/psychiatric ‘conditions,’ and Physical differences; 2) the movements for institutionalization, sterilization, and marriage and immigration restriction; and 3) late-twentieth century challenges to eugenics. The course will conclude with a discussion of the advent of genetic and prenatal screening, ‘selective abortion,’ and biomedical/psycho-pharmaceutical intervention and their relationship to the rise of the ‘new’ eugenics. Although the course focuses primarily on the United States, there is a strong international comparative component.


Introduction to Disability Studies

This course will introduce students to different theoretical and methodological approaches to studying disability within the Humanities and Social Sciences, as well as to the prominent debates within the field of Disability Studies. The study of disability within disciplines such as history, sociology, anthropology, English, political science, and geography has been of increasing interest to academic scholars. This course will provide an overview of the relatively new field of Disability Studies, enabling students to think critically about conventional conceptualizations of ability and of normality.


University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

Jun 22, 2010 to May 12, 2013 · Bachelor’s in Political Science · Buffalo, New York


Spectrum Photography Workshop II

Taking photographs for the UB Spectrum Newspaper to educate and inform the populace.


Spectrum Photography Workshop I

Taking photographs for the UB Spectrum Newspaper to educate and inform the populace.


American Presidency

Explores the presidency’s role in the politics and policy process of the United States, including growth, scope, and limits of presidential power.


Politics and Geography

This course introduces students to the interdependence of political life and its geographic context. The interrelationship of politics and geography is explored at the international, national, and local levels.


Politics and Society

Introduces students to classic and contemporary issues and readings in political sociology, centering on the relationship of social and political forces. Draws empirical illustrations and cases from American and other “advanced industrial” societies.


Sociology of Gender

The historical, social, and cultural construction of gender, focusing on the ways that femininities and masculinities are constructed from infancy through adulthood in the United States. Includes how gender shapes—and is shaped by—major social institutions such as media, sports, and work, as well as other characteristics such as social class, race/ethnicity, and sexuality.


Introduction to Comparative Politics

Introduces foreign political systems; explores significant political similarities and differences among countries.


Magic, Witchcraft, and Sorcery

Understanding the nature of magic and the anthropology of sorcery and witchcraft beliefs around the world and throughout history offers insights into some fundamental aspects of human belief and behavior. Considers ‘primitive’ beliefs as representative of universal beliefs and as background to the course’s consideration of ‘occult’ interests and fears in contemporary America.


Topics in Medical Anthropology: Disability and Culture

This course is an introduction to disability studies, an integrative subfield representing research by medical anthropologists, sociologists, psychologists, and historians, as well as clinical and social interventions by social workers, occupational and physical therapists, and public health agents. What unifies these disciplines is the search for understanding of societal and cross-cultural attitudes and policies regarding impairment, illness, and difference, especially those whose physical or behavioral differences have been stigmatized through negative social or medical labels.


Constitutional Law

Examines common law background of the American Constitution and the Constitution’s role in American politics; selected problem areas.


Legislative Politics

Studies legislative process in the United States; including organization, internal dynamics, and functioning of legislative bodies; and their relations with the executive and judicial branches and with groups in society.


Sociology of Diversity

Provides a sociological introduction to diversity in American society. Explores the bases and social implications of difference with particular reference to issues of race, ethnicity, religion, class, and gender.


Sex: Gender and Popular Culture

The advent of television in 1950s America, coupled with technological advances in filmmaking popularized visual culture as a primary means of both naming and interrogating the ways in which we understand the social constructions of race, sex, gender, and sexuality. Feminist perspectives are ways of examining how these social constructions (and expectations) are shaped by popular culture, mainly television programming and films; and thus shape our ideas about ourselves and others as “feminine” and “masculine” and “sexual” beings. We consider a number of questions including (1) how does “entertainment” act as a substitute for the transmission of social knowledge?; (2) what are the advantages and disadvantages of popular culture in the construction of contemporary American life?; (3) how does popular culture define “racialized” bodies?; and (4) how does popular culture impact the consumption of American socio-cultural values, globally?


The Diversity Advocates

Students highly value the diversity at UB. To engage students as peer advocates and educators, the IDC provides an exciting multicultural leadership opportunity through the Diversity Advocate 3 credit-hour course. Diversity Advocates are undergraduate peer educators committed to promoting diversity and social justice, increase awareness and knowledge of diversity-related issues, create dialogue that explores the definition and perception of diversity and work to build a University community. Diversity Advocates conduct educational workshops and plan celebratory events on campus.


Greek Civilization

Elements of Greek civilization analyzed from synchronistic and developmental views to produce a coherent image of that culture as a living and expanding entity.


Introduction to International Politics

Introduces contemporary and historical international relations; also examines nationalism, imperialism, power diplomacy, and ideological conflict.


Language: Society & the Individual

Introduces the functions of language in social groups; the acquisition of language; the relationships among language, thought, and culture; bilingualism and second language teaching.


Myth & Religion of the Ancient World

Provides an introduction to the mythology of the Greeks and Romans. In addition to considering the myths themselves, we study how they have been employed by ancient through contemporary cultures as reflected in areas ranging from religious and social practice to works of art and architecture.


Basic Statistics for Social Science

Introduces statistics and their applications in political science.


Cases in Civil Liberties

This class examines case analyses of individual rights and liberties as defined by courts in the United States.


Tompkins Cortland Community College

Class of 2010 · Associates in Liberal Arts and Sciences · Dryden, New York


Bowling

Students taking this course learn the basics of bowling, including, but not limited to the techniques of bowling, rules of the game, scoring, history of bowling, and governing organizations. The class meets each week at a local bowling facility. Additional fee required. 1 Cr. (2 Lab. for 5 weeks) Fall and spring semesters.


Introduction to Sociology

This is an introductory study of the basic concepts, theoretical principles, and methods used within the discipline of sociology. Emphasis is on group interaction, social and cultural processes, and the structure and organization of American social institutions. SOCI 101 fulfills the SUNY General Education Social Sciences requirement. An honors section is offered. Prerequisite: Prior completion or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 100. 3 Cr. (3 Lec.) Fall and spring semesters.


Introduction to Psychology

This course provides students with a basic understanding of psychology. Theories and research relating to emotions and stress, abnormal behavior, motivation, learning, personality, methods of therapy, biology and behaviors, developmental psychology, and social psychology are discussed. PSYC 103 fulfills the SUNY General Education Social Sciences requirement. An honors section is offered. Prerequisite: Prior completion or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 100. 3 Cr. (3 Lec.) Fall and spring semesters.


Public Administration

An introductory level course on public administration in the American context. Students study the development and application of basic principles and concepts underlying how public policies are designed, implemented, and evaluated by federal, state and local bureaucracies in a democratic political system. Prerequisite: Prior completion or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 100. 3 Cr. (3 Lec.) Fall and spring semesters.


American State and Local Government

This course is designed to study the forms, function, and services of state governments and representative local governments. The dynamics of state and local governments are also considered. POSC 104 fulfills the SUNY General Education Social Sciences requirement. Prerequisite: Prior completion or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 100. 3 Cr. (3 Lec.) Fall and spring semesters.


American National Government

An examination of the essentials of the American constitutional system, the function of political parties, the concept of the federal system, the role of administrative agencies, the methods by which foreign affairs are conducted, and the manners in which conflicting ideals are resolved in a democratic system. POSC 103 fulfills the SUNY General Education Social Sciences requirement. Prerequisite: Prior completion or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 100. 3 Cr. (3 Lec.) Fall and spring semesters.


Introduction to Philosophy

A study of the historical positions of both ancient and modern philosophers, with respect to the basic philosophical problems of knowledge, reality, matter, soul, mind, and God. PHIL 101 fulfills the SUNY General Education Humanities requirement. Prerequisite: Prior completion or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 100. 3 Cr. (3 Lec.) Fall and spring semesters.


College Algebra and Trigonometry

This course covers fundamental algebra and trigonometry between elementary algebra and pre-calculus. Topics include polynomial and rational expressions, graphing, functions, first and second-degree equations, polynomials and rational equations, absolute value, transformations, complex numbers, and right triangles and functional trigonometry. A specified model of graphing calculator is required. MATH 132 fulfills the SUNY General Education Mathematics requirement. Prerequisites: Prior completion or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 100, and a C or better grade in MATH 100, or appropriate qualifying test score. 3 Cr. (3 Lec.) Fall and spring semesters.


Health and Fitness

Students closely examine the elements of health and health-related components of physical fitness in this introductory course. Planning and participating in an interesting successful exercise and nutrition program is a fundamental aspect of this course. Successfully preventing, responding to injury/illness, and increasing or maintaining a productive level of energy are all issues which, when managed properly, contribute to an improved quality of life. Additional topics addressed include finding meaningful work, enjoying leisure activities, growing older successfully, and improving and protecting the environment. 1 Cr. (1 Lec.) Fall and spring semesters.


Fundamentals of Speech

Fundamentals of Speech is designed to aid in developing effective oral communication techniques. The course consists of the study of the principles and the methods of public address, the preparation and delivery of speeches, and the analysis of student and outside speakers. Extemporaneous speaking and the development of organization in speech composition are stressed. Prerequisite: ENGL 100. 3 Cr. (3 Lec.) Fall and spring semesters.


Approaches to Literature

Provides a comprehensive introduction to the major aspects of literature. Extensive writing, using various rhetorical modes, helps students appreciate and understand fiction, drama, and poetry as forms of literary expression. ENGL 102 fulfills the SUNY General Education Humanities requirement. An honors section is offered. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 3 Cr. (3 Lec.) Fall and spring semesters.


Academic Writing II

Students develop and refine an effective writing process of planning, invention, drafting, and revision. They develop the critical thinking skills necessary to research topics and write and revise academic papers. Context for the assignments, which may be centered on a theme, is provided by scholarly readings drawn from a variety of disciplines. Students develop information literacy skills as they engage in the research process. Student writing will be properly documented. ENGL 101 fulfills the SUNY General Education Basic Communication requirement. An honors section is offered. Prerequisite: C or better grade in ENGL 100 or appropriate assessment. 3 Cr. (3 Lec.) Fall and spring semesters.


Introduction to Databases

An introduction to the operation and uses of a database management program. The student will learn how to create and manipulate a simple relational database using Access. Topics include creating and modifying tables, addition of and modification of data in tables, using queries to view data in one or more tables, use of forms to view and update tables, and creation of simple reports including mailing labels. Students taking this course in an online format must have access to a computer with Microsoft Access. Prerequisite: Familiarity working in a Microsoft Windows environment is recommended. 1 Cr. (2 Lec., 2 Lab. for 5 weeks) Fall and spring semesters.


Introduction to Spreadsheets

An introduction to the operation and uses of a spreadsheet program. Topics covered parallel the objectives used for the Microsoft Office User Specialist (MOUS) Core Exam in Excel and include working with cells and cell data, managing workbooks, formatting and printing worksheets, modifying workbooks, creating and revising formulas, creating and modifying graphics, and workgroup collaboration. Students taking this course in an online format should have access to a computer with Excel. Prerequisite: Familiarity working in a Microsoft Windows environment is recommended. 1 Cr. (2 Lec., 2 Lab. for 5 weeks) Fall and spring semesters.


Introduction to Word Processing

An introduction to the operation and uses of a word-processing program that covers topics related to the objectives used for the Microsoft Office User Specialist (MOUS) Core Exam in Word. Topics include inserting and modifying text, creating and modifying paragraphs, formatting documents, managing documents, working with graphics, and workgroup collaboration. Students taking this course in an online format should have access to a computer with Word. Students may not receive credit for both CAPS 105 and CAPS 111 toward their degree program. Prerequisite: Familiarity working in a Microsoft Windows environment is recommended. 1 Cr. (2 Lec., 2 Lab. for 5 weeks) Fall and spring semester.


Principles of Chemistry I

This is a study of the basic principles of chemistry including measurement, atomic structure, bonding, mole concept, stoichiometry, and chemical formulas and equations. It is intended for students who have not had a chemistry course. Quantitative laboratory experiments are performed utilizing fundamental principles studied in the course. Substantial outside preparation for the laboratories will be required. CHEM 101 fulfills the SUNY General Education Natural Sciences requirement. A student may only apply credit earned in CHEM 101 or CHEM 107 toward degree requirements. Prerequisite: MATH 095 or equivalent. 4 Cr. (3 Lec., 2 Lab.) Fall and spring semesters.


Principles of Biology I

BIOL 101 is the first course of a two-semester sequence presenting an overview of major biological principles. Course topics include chemistry as it relates to organisms, cell morphology and physiology, and genetics. The course is intended for students who do not plan to transfer to an upper level major in science, environmental science, medicine, or a science-related field. Nursing students may take BIOL 101 and CHEM 101 to meet their program requirements. Substantial outside preparation for lectures and laboratories is required. BIOL 101 fulfills the SUNY General Education Natural Sciences requirement. Students may not apply credit for both BIOL 101 and BIOL 104 toward their degree. Prerequisite: Prior completion or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 100. 3 Cr. (2 Lec., 2 Lab.) Fall and spring semesters.


Cornell University

Class of 2004 · Summer College · Ithaca, New York


History of Rome I

Rome’s beginnings and the Roman Republic. A general introduction to Roman history from the foundation of Rome in the middle of the eighth century BC to the end of the Republic (31 BC). The course is the first part of a two-semester survey of Roman history up to the deposition of the last Roman Emperor in the West (AD 476). Examines the rise of Rome from a village in Italy to an imperial power over the Mediterranean world and considers the political, economic, and social consequences of that achievement.


Academic Writing

Academic writing with an emphasis on improving organization, grammar, vocabulary, and style through the writing and revision of short papers. Frequent individual conferences supplement class work. This course is suitable for students who are still in high school or have just graduated and whose schooling has been in languages other than English.


2003 - 2004 School Year · High School Equivelency · Boulder, Colorado  

History of World Art 1

Surveys major art styles from the Paleolithic period through the Renaissance, including European, Asian, and the Pre-Columbian/Islamic world. Emphasizes comparison of Western and non-Western visual expressions as evidence of differing cultural orientations. Approved for GT-AH1. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: literature and the arts.


History of World Art 2

Surveys major art styles from about 1600 to the present, including Europe, Asia, the Islamic world, the Americas, and tribal arts. Emphasizes comparison of Western and non-Western visual expressions as evidence of differing cultural orientations. Credit not granted for this course and FINE 1409. Approved for GT-AH1. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: literature and the arts.


Cornell University

Class of 2003 · Summer College · Ithaca, New York


Democracy and Its Discontents

“We hold these truths to be self-evident” is perhaps the most famous political expression in U.S. history. Among the truths the signers to the Declaration of Independence endorsed was “that all men are created equal, and endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights.” As the nation grew, citizens of every social class appealed to these ideas to claim their rights and to define American democracy in new ways.

In this program, you’ll explore these “truths,” and the evolution of democracy and dissent in America, as you focus on some of the most dramatic and important episodes in American history, including:

  • The struggles over the emancipation of slaves in the nineteenth century
  • Expanded rights for women and working people in the twentieth century
  • Free-speech issues
  • The civil rights movement
  • Religion-based critiques of American culture, and
  • Conservative critiques of American liberalism